Aboriginality: The Literary Origins of British Columbia, Vol. 2

Aboriginality

Aboriginality

The Literary Origins of British Columbia, Vol. 2

by Alan Twigg

$24.95

    • Autumn 2005
    • ISBN 978-1-55380-030-9 (1-55380-030-3)
    • ebook ISBN 978-1-55380-080-4
    • 6″ x 9″ Trade Paperback, 250 pages
    • Aboriginals, History, Pacific Northwest




Following the success of First Invaders, Alan Twigg turns his attention to First Nations writers, unearthing more than 300 books by more than 170 mostly unheralded aboriginal authors.

Taking the reader from residential schools to art galleries, this lively and unprecedented panorama of British Columbia includes trailblazer Pauline Johnson, political organizer George Manuel, Haida carver Bill Reid, indigenous rights activist Jeannette Armstrong, pioneering novelist Mourning Dove, actor Chief Dan George, painters George Clutesi and Norval Morrisseau (living in Nanaimo), politician Len Marchand, playwright Marie Clements and Haisla novelist Eden Robinson.

Equally important, Aboriginality sheds new light on fascinating, lesser-known figures such as Chief William Sepass, Howard Adams, Domanic Charlie, Earl Maquinna George, George Hunt, Chief Charlie Nowell, Henry Pennier, Harry Robinson, Gordon Robinson (Eden Robinson’s uncle), James Sewid and Michael Nicoll Yagulanaas—to name only a few. Nearly half the author profiles are women, including Marilyn Dumont, Lizette Hall, Heather Harris, Beverly Hungry Wolf, Mary John, Vera Manuel, Lee Maracle, Gloria Nahanee, Daphne Odjig, Bernadette Rosetti, Shirley Sterling, Gloria Cranmer Webster, Ellen White, Annabel Cropped Eared Wolf and Annie Zetco York.

Each author is presented in historical and chronological context, along with background material on aboriginal history, as well as rare photos, illustrations and a comprehensive bibliography.

“Twigg’s new book alters the face of Canadian literature. It is a must-read.” —Wendy Wickwire, History Dept., University of Victoria

“Alan Twigg’s Aboriginality is unprecedented and indispensable.” —Howard White, Publisher, Encyclopedia of British Columbia

Alan Twigg’s Literary History of British Columbia:

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Reviews & Awards:

“Aboriginality is not a comprehensive reference work by any means, but it’s something more valuable: a starting point for discovering the mostly unsung native writers who have put pen to paper in B.C. . . . a must-read” —Vancouver Sun

“Twigg is the Ali Baba of Canadian literary studies. He finds literary gems from the often silent and discursive past and brings them to life.” —Papers of the Bibliographical Society of Canada

“[Aboriginality] offers a wealth of selections, a menu to explore, to devour, for any readers with similar motivation to know this place and its cultures.” —Prairie Fire

“a satisfying read for anyone who is interested in knowing more about the work of aboriginal writers and artists.” —Pacific Rim Book Review