Vintage 1999

Vintage 1999 by League of Canadian Poets

Vintage 1999

by League of Canadian Poets

$15.95

  • ISBN 978-0-921870-70-8 (0-921870-70-1)
  • 6″ x 9″ Trade Paperback, 124 pages
  • Poetry






Each year the League of Canadian Poets sponsors the prestigious National Poetry Contest. From the thousands of entries received, the judges choose three prize winners and a list of honourable mentions. The annual anthology publishes the finest poetry of the year.

First prize winner is Susan M. Stenson of Victoria, BC, for her poem “When You Say Infidelity.” Second prize winner is Peter Richardson of Morin Heights, Quebec, for “Dig.” Third prize winner is Brent MacLaine of Charlottetown, PEI, for “Southward to Kissimmee.” Other well known poets include Bert Almon, Antonia Banyard, Diane Brebner, Cathy Ford and Jay Ruzesky. Also included are the winners of the 1999 special competition for Canadian elementary and secondary school students.

Vintage 1999 is an ideal introduction to the vitality and diversity of the Canadian poetry community. Previous editions have been adopted widely for use in schools, colleges and universities.

“Some of the best poetry written in Canada . . . ever.”
— John B. Lee

“It is encouraging to see these volumes in school and public libraries, for they contain the kinds of fine poetry that encourage younger writers to continue writing and publishing.”
— Prof. Ronald B. Hatch, Dept of English, UBC

When You Say Infidelity

it sounds like something in the garden
planted beside foxglove, forget-me-not.
It is not beautiful
but your friends will recognize
the stems and furry leaves, hungover,
may even whisper its Latin name

The species you are most likely to find
thrives anywhere, the guidebooks will say
under the cozy light of a neighbour’s kitchen,
in Best Westerns, close to the nearest exit,
at the party where I play
piano. Upstairs on a guest bed
I find you with a friend, I’ll call Margery.
My Margery. If it were a movie,
I could close my eyes.
Later walk in the garden.
Margery planting roots
in that hard place between
the heart and a bad day
or above the trellis
thin and reserved in this light
where infidelity now hangs.

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